Online dating research studies

As of November 2014, 332 million people had Linked In profiles.

"I do think mobile dating is going to be the main driver of this growth."The research, based on a survey of more than 19,000 individuals who married between 20, also found relationships that began online are slightly happier and less likely to split than those that started offline.Findings, published in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, put the percentage of married couples that now meet online at almost 35% -- which gives what may be the first broad look at the overall percentage of new marriages that result from meeting online.About 45% of couples met on dating sites; the rest met on online social networks, chat rooms, instant messaging or other online forums. Nearly 4,000 studies have already picked apart the details of top dating profiles, analyzed when webcam chats tend to bomb and highlighted the most attractive usernames.Now, in the one meta data analysis to rule them all, scientists have collated reams of online dating research into a scientific recipe for turning an OK Cupid conversation into a first date.